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(@goodguy)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 153
 

Kim,
Yes it's me. Sorry I changed my name here a while back when DMS went through it's little transition. I hate to have so many names:
Kevin
better
betterthan
goodguy
and just for marie I have created betterthantyouslut


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(@informer)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 95
 

USC CARBOMBED-MUSLIM SPLINTER GROUP TAKES CREDIT

Captain America - Early this morning I received an urgent telephone call in which the caller, screaming into the phone, informed me of the following: He was a member of a Muslim splinter group located in Canada that was headed by OSMANLI bin SALAMI who was a frequent poster to the USC. He went on to say that they have become impatient with the constant threats of their Heroic Warrier being banned from the USC and of his fearless posting being constantly deleted by Russian moderators. They have called upon Allah for guidence in protecting OSMALI from the aggressive thuggery being perpetuated upon their great warrior leader by Russian bandits and criminals. By the grace and guidence of ALLAH we will gallantly car bomb the USC under the cover of Allah's early morning darkness and free our great and heroic leader OSMANLI bin SALAMI from his bonds. He screamed "ALLAH AKBAR" into the phone then hung up.
=================================================

Couldn't open an account as Captain America because the dummies listed our e-mail address when they opened INFORMER account and I can't use it with another Username.


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(@goodguy)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 153
 

That's funny! I didn't think Osalami was being deleted. I had tried to tell the Russians not to delete him just for the sake of laughs at his posts, and for the fact that I'm kinda getting tired of seeing anti-US and pro-Russian posts only. Some of those fuccking people at USC are to goddamn sensitive......


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(@informer)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 95
 

Better, especially by those who live in the U.S.


Captain not informer


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(@goodguy)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 153
 

Cool, so we will some action over here eh?

better...


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(@goodguy)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 153
 

Are you serious about the phone call?

better


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(@informer)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 95
 

BETTER:

In answer to your question, how the farck does one car bomb a web site forum? HA HA HA. It was only a joke that I thought fitting, given the current situation in Chechnya.


Captain


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(@alexandernevsky)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 648
 

I never deleted the osmani bin salami.Its better he is on there and the more he quacks the stupider he looks .Anywho the board says up in 15 mins maintenence work being performed.


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(@alexandernevsky)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 648
 

Not Israel's to give
By John Whitbeck*

There will never be a perfect moment to formalise the transformation of Palestinian governmental institutions from the "Authority" to the "State" and for Palestine to apply for full member state status at the United Nations. The daily dead and maimed of the Al-Aqsa Intifada may well make a statehood "declaration" at this point in the Palestinian liberation struggle seem like an act of empty symbolism even in sympathetic eyes.

However, much more than symbolism is at stake, and there may never be a more favourable moment for Palestine to successfully claim its inalienable rights as a nation-state among nation-states than between now and 20 January 2001, when the new president of the United States will take office. The scheduling of early Israeli elections makes the favourable timing even clearer.

While President Arafat promised to establish the State of Palestine on the soil of Palestine on 4 May 1999 and, subsequently, on 13 September 2000, he has also let slip on several occasions that the State of Palestine already exists. As a legal matter, this is clearly correct. Within two months of the declaration of Palestinian independence and statehood on 15 November 1988, more than 100 other sovereign states had recognised the State of Palestine (more than recognised Israel at that time). Even the United States and European countries which have not yet extended formal diplomatic recognition to the State of Palestine have for years welcomed President Arafat with the honours and protocol due to a head of state. Since its establishment of "effective control" over a portion of Palestinian territory in 1994, Palestine has met all of the criteria for sovereign statehood pursuant to customary international law.

It should be clear to all with open eyes that the "Palestinian Authority" has always been a transparent euphemism for the State of Palestine, a "Trojan Horse" through which the state has penetrated the walls of the occupation and established itself on its national soil. What then is to be gained by "re-proclaiming" the state and seeking UN membership while the occupation of most Palestinian territory remains firmly, and violently, in place?

The failure to reaffirm the existence of the state, particularly after repeated public promises to do so, has left the dangerous (and false) impression, particularly in Israeli and American eyes, that Palestinian statehood is within Israel's power to grant or deny -- and that the Palestinians must pay a price, through relinquishing some of their rights, to obtain Israel's consent to what the European Union, in its Berlin Declaration issued on 25 March 1999, reaffirmed is an "unqualified Palestinian right... which is not subject to any veto". This conspicuous failure has itself become a major obstacle to peace, an obstacle which must be removed.

Moreover, if Palestine were to be admitted to the United Nations as a member state within its pre-1967 borders, then it would be indisputable that the Palestinian territories conquered by Israel in 1967 are not "disputed" but occupied (illegally so) -- and that the Israeli occupation of Palestine is, legally, no different from the Iraqi occupation of Kuwait (except that Iraq claimed sovereignty over all of Kuwait, while Israel has never claimed sovereignty over any part of the occupied Palestinian territories except expanded East Jerusalem). This is not to say that Security Council-approved sanctions, blockades and "overwhelming force" against Israel would be imminent. However, the field on which a new, improved, post-Oslo phase of the "peace process" would be played out would be fundamentally different - and vastly more advantageous - for Palestine. The end of the occupation would no longer be a question of whether but rather a question of when.

Furthermore, by seizing the initiative in this way, Palestine would dodge the bullet of a nightmare scenario -- Israel's preemptive recognition of a Palestinian state, but only within the small portion of the West Bank (excluding Jerusalem) and the Gaza Strip currently subject to Palestinian Authority control. Another part of the scenario would be Israeli success (with American pressure and threats fully deployed) in convincing many countries to recognise Palestine only within those Bantustan borders, thereby effectively transforming the rest of the occupied Palestinian territories into "disputed" territories and subordinating international law and UN Security Council Resolution 242 to the principle that "might makes right." This is a threat which should be taken seriously.

Imagine then that, between now and 20 January, President Arafat were to publicly confirm that the State of Palestine has been legally sovereign in all the Palestinian territories occupied in 1967, including Jerusalem, since the state was proclaimed in 1988, that the "Palestinian Authority" through which the state established its presence and authority on a portion of its national territory has ceased to exist with the termination of the "Oslo process" and that all Palestinian governmental institutions established on Palestinian territory as organs of the "Palestinian Authority" are now governmental institutions of the State of Palestine.

Imagine further that he were then to appeal for diplomatic recognition from all states which have not already recognised the State of Palestine and to announce that the State of Palestine is applying to upgrade its status at the United Nations from "permanent observer" (a status in which "Palestine" replaced the PLO in December 1988, one month after Palestine's declaration of independence, and which was upgraded to an effective "super-observer" or "quasi-state" status in July 1998) to full member state.

Imagine finally that, at the same time, President Arafat were to confirm his eagerness and that of the State of Palestine to negotiate with the current Israeli government, prior to the forthcoming Israeli elections, a permanent status agreement dealing definitively with all outstanding issues (including Jerusalem and refugees) with a view to achieving a new relationship between the two states and peoples based on peaceful coexistence, mutual respect and human dignity so as to finally provide peace and security for both Israelis and Palestinians in the land both peoples love.

How would the international community react? The consistent support of the international community for Palestinian statehood was again demonstrated in December 1999 when the UN General Assembly adopted its annual resolution reaffirming "the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, including the option of a State" and expressing "the hope that the Palestinian people will soon be exercising their right to self-determination, which is not subject to any veto" by a vote of 156 to two (Israel and the United States), with only one abstention. When this and other resolutions supporting the Palestinian people were adopted by the General Assembly this 2 December, Israel and the United States again stood alone against the rest of the world.

While a handful of US-dominated countries might decline to extend immediate diplomatic recognition to Palestine, only one country, the United States, would consider vetoing Palestine's application for UN membership. In normal times, a veto would be highly likely. Fortunately, these are not normal times. President Clinton must be well aware that vetoing Palestine's UN membership, particularly after the events of recent months, would provoke an explosion of anti-American rage and violence, with American citizens and embassies becoming targets throughout the Muslim world. He would derive absolutely no personal benefit from ending his presidency on such a catastrophic note -- quite the contrary. However, the same personal and political considerations would not apply to his successor. (It is worth noting that the US-PLO "dialogue" began in December 1988 during just such a post-election period.)

While the United Sates would never extend diplomatic recognition to Palestine unless Israel had already given it permission, or instructed it, to do so, for a few precious weeks between now and mid-January a Palestinian application for UN membership would be much more likely to produce an American abstention than an American veto -- and thus to succeed in making Palestine a full member of the international community.

What could Mr Barak do? He is already inflicting military and economic violence on Palestinians to a degree which has caused neutral observers to characterise Israel's acts as war crimes and seems to recognise, better than his top military men, that intensifying Israeli brutality is likely to prove counter-productive. Furthermore, virtually all Israeli commentators agree that Mr Barak's only hope of re-election rests on reaching a "peace deal" with the Palestinians, and the experience of the 1996 election, in which Shimon Peres chose to emphasise his capacity for nastiness to Arabs rather than to offer any vision of peace, is convincing evidence that such an electoral strategy is a sure loser for the political "centre" in Israel.

In these circumstances, one could expect Mr Barak to shrug off the absorption of the Palestinian Authority into the Palestinian State and to publicly minimise its importance, while silently recognising that, in any future negotiations, the Palestinians will continue to insist on their full rights under international law and relevant UN resolutions, that the Palestinian negotiating position will henceforth be much stronger than ever before and that Israel will never have peace or security until it offers Palestine peace terms far closer to full compliance with international law and UN resolutions than any which he or any other Israeli Prime Minister has ever imagined before. On this basis, peace will finally be possible -- perhaps even before the next Israeli elections.

A rare window of opportunity will be open for the next few weeks. After that, it will close -- perhaps for years.


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(@alexandernevsky)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 648
 

On Thursday, Igor Zubov, Deputy Interior Minister of Russia, reported that according to Russian special services, Chechen rebel leaders and their foreign sponsors have decided to replace mercenaries from Arab countries with representatives of former southern Soviet republics.


According to the General, the fact can be confirmed by the detention Thursday morning in the territory of Daghestan of 12 Afghan citizens who illegally crossed the Russian-Azerbaijani border. The detainees, Tajik and Uzbek nationals, were supposed to join the Chechen rebel ranks.


Zubov reported that the Russian side had obtained information on the arrival of several such groups to Azerbaijan and other countries of the region. He expressed gratitude to his Azerbaijani counterparts for their contribution to the operation to detain the mercenary group.


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(@alexandernevsky)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 648
 

MOSCOW HOPES DENMARK REALISES THE RISK OF FLIRTING WITH INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM






Moscow hopes that Danish official political circles realise the risk they run while flirting with international terrorist forces and take actions to suppress incidents like the one that took place by the Russian embassy in Copenhagen," reads a statement issued by a Russian foreign ministry spokesperson, a copy of which has been forwarded to RIA Novosti today.


The statement was prompted by the so-called torch-light vigil in support of Chechen separatists, which took place in Copenhagen. Despite numerous appeals to join the action, only 20 people turned up by the Russian embassy building.


According to the foreign ministry statement, the vigil, planned as an anti-Russian act, was sanctioned by local authorities, including members of parliament and public figures. Noting that it is not the first incident of the kind /last January, an extremist claiming to be a supporter of "independent Ichkeria" threw several Molotov cocktails at the Russian embassy, wounding a Russian diplomat and inflicting damages on the building/, the Russian foreign ministry warns that any recurring incidents might afflict friendly Russian-Danish relations.


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(@goodguy)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 153
 

I was asking about the phone call not the car bombing..... But then again how would they get your #?


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(@fredledingue)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 719
 

What there are still chechen rebel ranks???


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(@delenne)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 572
 

* President Arafat were to publicly confirm that the State of Palestine has been legally sovereign in all the Palestinian territories occupied in 1967,
Quite a play. Was that a State of Palestine, or a State of Jordan?;o))
The war of 67 was (as usual) not started by Israel.

* President Clinton must be well aware that ... would provoke an explosion of anti-American rage and violence, with American citizens and embassies becoming targets throughout the Muslim world.
Interesting mind-play. "Fearing" and admitting a threat of terrorist actions, that he would denounce otherwise, and using it to "prove" the point.
It seems the Muslim world is full of violent elements ...;o))

* He is already inflicting military and economic violence on Palestinians to a degree which has caused neutral observers to characterise Israel's acts as war crimes ...
I heard that, what was it ... Serbia, it seems ...;o))
A normal response to a Middle East "Chechniya".
"Don't attack military installations", "Don't dally around firepower" - is a good recipe to stay safe and sound.
BTH, what is economic violence in view of the "Palestinian de-facto state"?
A small secret - having a state Arafat did nothing to make it a state considering hu-u-u-u-ge sums of aid money poured (and pouring) in from the Arabs, UN ... , well, he built his offices. LOL.
Israel was rolling with laughter, when Arafat demanded jobs for his people - it's ridiculous - wasn't it his responsibility to build a state and provide jobs? Or is he just a tribal chief-megalomaniac?;o))
They burned down several factories open on their territories by Israelis. I guess, they are happy with it now. In all this "Palestinian State" "saga" (in it's most ridiculous sense) Palestinians have been only destroying ... .

* On this basis, peace will finally be possible ...
Some very cold peace, maybe, sustained by threat of firepower and occasional elimination of too active "delinquents", because the Hizballah, Islamic Jihad and various "brothers" "Employment Ministries" have to provide for "continuous and fruitful employment" for their "folks".


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(@delenne)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 572
 

By the way, Happy Chanukah!


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