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(@x)
Estimable Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 108
January 7, 2000 11:16 pm  

Dear Stovall


The world now is a lot more complex then it was 200 years ago and what is happening in Chechenya is complex. First,we have a huge countrie (Russia) who is living an inside revolution (politic,economic,social..) and this countrie is fighting to don't fall apart. Second,Chechenya was already (de facto) independent but some of his elements try to export in Russia (Dagestan) by force the islamic thinking (fanatism).(It is a causa bellis).Russia accept any religion but not a religious power (U.S or Canada have the same position ). Third, there was a large disorder inside Chechenya were is living a russian minority. Quadro, the U.S and Russia are fighting to control the petrolium of the region and the lost of control of the region could mean a great economical defeat....You know, this war is very..very complex and it's impossible to compare with the American Revolution...and everything is not black or white. You can't compare an apple with an orange.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
January 7, 2000 11:22 pm  

OK, this is silly. The point of Stalin's deportation of Chechens comes up all the time. However, people tend to forget that along with Chechens, 7 other nations were deported. Do you see them taking their anger out on innocent people? If they really want to get their revenge why not do it on Georgians? After all, Stalin was Georgian.


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 x
(@x)
Estimable Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 108
January 7, 2000 11:30 pm  

Other canadian patriot


What I am thinking about democratie in Canada is exactly the thinking of Jean Chrétien (premier of Canada). Canada is the greatest democraty in the world and it is why the quebecquers vote to stay in Canada. They are free...It is the only countrie in the world who accept a vote on his unity...it is great.


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(@armenian1)
Reputable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 341
January 8, 2000 12:11 am  

Armenian says: Russia has its right for unity. Chechnya has its right for an independence. A conflict was unavoidable. Considering the West current policy, West looses in any case. It all was started in Yugoslavia. Now is a pay time for NATO sticking its nose where it does belong to. The world is pretty much balanced and no one even arrogant NATO can shift it right or left.

So Chechens should stay low with their ambitions or they will call a real hell upon their heads. They did not see s..t yet!


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(@caucasian)
Trusted Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 86
January 8, 2000 3:09 am  

Yeah, really - Canada rules!

X, bravo! D'accord avec vous absulment..


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(@caucasian)
Trusted Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 86
January 8, 2000 3:22 am  

Peut etre ce que je dis n'est pas "politicaly corect" mais je suis ne la et je sais que ces gens sont savage islamist et il'y a un sole solution: avant le referndum d'independence a Chechenya il faut eliminer les terroristes.


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(@fenriz_culto)
Estimable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 139
January 8, 2000 5:12 am  

Other Canadian Patriot ( - 199.212.135.212) on Friday, January 7, 2000 - 09:49 pm:

The difference is this: Canada would allow Quebec to separate should the people of Quebec
decide to do so - they haven't yet


The difference is this: Quebec has a status of Province in Canada and under constitutional rights with the democratic referendum can separate. As you might not have known, former SU republics had the same rights and so there are now 15 different countries instead of one Union. Chechnia did not/ does not possess this type of status.

The clear majority of Quebecers wants to remain part of Canada,
as shown by previous referendums and recent polling


Of course, clear majority did not show that; as I refuse to call 48% of voters (who was voting for separation) "clear minority". And if you look at votes of people of "french decent" this number is way higher: over 60%. Unless Quebec acquires a load of immigrants in a near future who would contribute to "pro-canadian" vote; I'm afraid our Canada will not include Quebeck >;)

Russia does not want
Chechnya to cecede, although a vast majority of Chechens would vote for independence


Right.....hehe....did you see this vote taking place, ehh? BTW, I'm personnally don't have any problems for referendum in Chechnia some time after the campain as far as all non-chechens who got banished/killed by scums since 1991 would be included in a vote as "NO" and northeren part of Chechnia unconditionally would go to Russia.


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(@fenriz_culto)
Estimable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 139
January 8, 2000 5:32 am  

Other Canadian Patriot ( - 199.212.135.212) on Friday, January 7, 2000 - 09:49 pm:

.......cont.

Canada is
not only a democracy,
it has been voted by the UN the #1 country in the
world in terms of standard of life


Not the last year, we are NOT. I believe Canada got 3rd place, which is still way better than US of A.

including Stalin's failed attempt to wipe out the Chechen
people altogether


Not true; there were repressions but not the genocide, (along with over 100 different nationalities including russians who suffered the most); you also conviniently forgot that 15 years after chechens who were displaced ,were allowed to return. In fact chechens did indeed proactively support Nazies so here we go. Anyhow, a weak argument to justify chechen actions.

There is no
clear evidence that Chechens were responsable for the terrorist bombings in Moscov, russia's main
reason for this war.


I thought to reply to this already outdated remark but mercifully ® was quicker 🙂

The Chechen leadership denies any role in the bombings.

MUAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!
Once in Kennedy airport I was asked by US customs officer if I was currently or in the past taking a part in terrorist activities...very dumb question, yes?

Fenriz


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 locc
(@locc)
Active Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 10
January 8, 2000 6:07 am  

WASSUP CANADA

DROPPIN OUT MY BIG A$$ WASSSUP 2 U FROM CALIFORNIA. JUST CHILLIN HERE, READIN' ALL THESE POSTS, KINDA TIRED OF FIGHTIN' WITH DUMB PEOPLE, WAITIN' 4 NEW TOPICS, BUT SO FAR JUST GETTIN' MORE PEACEFUL, UNLESS SOMEBODY VANDALIZES MY QUIET NEST, IF U KNOW WHAT I MEAN... TO ALL MY ARMENIAN, RUSSIAN AND OTHER CHRISTIAN BROTHERS HERE...TAKE CARE Y'ALL AND MERRY XMAS


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(@artemiskatt)
Active Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 6
January 8, 2000 11:23 am  

where y'all been, blood?
xmas is in the rearview now
heh


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(@fletch)
New Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1
January 8, 2000 12:45 pm  

ROGER (whoever you are)
This is a Russian Crisis Message Board - NOT
AMERICAN Message Board, tho some Americans do visit here. Some even have meaningful conversation.
YOU, on the other hand, are NOT AMERICAN, and
for sure not Christian. So why not do a lot of people a favor and GET LOST.


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 x
(@x)
Estimable Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 108
January 8, 2000 1:51 pm  

Caucasian


Oui, il est évident qu'il serait impossible de tenir un référendum en Tchétchénie. Aucune des conditions normales de la démocratie n'y existent et ne pourront y exister avant de nombreuse années. La plupart des éléments controleurs de cette société sont anti-démocratiques: pouvoir central faible et sans autorité, banditisme ouvert sans tentative de controle de l'état, groupes extrémistes armés agissant indépendemment de l'état, aucun économie organisée, racisme ouvert, nazification de la jeunesse par des groupes militaires barbares...ect...La liste serait très longue...La Tchétchénie ne peut actuellement fonctionner par elle-meme et assumer ses responsabilités comme état autonome d'autant plus qu'elle est irresponsable vis-à-vis ses voisins et sa minorité russe. Il est d'ailleurs insensé que certains de ses éléments attaquent ouvertement un état très puissant comme la Russie (Dagestan) par les armes pour ensuite se plaindre de la réaction militaire de la Russie. Définitivement, la Tchétchénie n'est pas prete pour l,autonomie.


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 x
(@x)
Estimable Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 108
January 8, 2000 2:01 pm  

It is not an american message board...It is a " world message board "...Yahoo is doing business all around the world...Period.


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(@fletch)
New Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1
January 8, 2000 2:12 pm  

Roger
Don't give me that REAL American crap. You would not know a REAL AMERICAN if he BIT you. And we know all about your, so called, CCF. You do not speak well for it. You do not speak well for ANYTHING do you?
By the way..How DO yoy manage to get ALL 12 words of your vocabulary into one post.


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(@ultrarussiannationalist)
Honorable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 504
January 8, 2000 2:19 pm  

After Ten Years Of Yeltsin, Soviet Heritage Remains Strong
By Marielle Eudes

The Soviet Union and state planning are dead, prices have been freed, the ruble is convertible and property is private, but still, in spite of Boris Yeltsin's 10-year reign, the Soviet system that lasted for 70 years remains deeply ingrained.

The Soviet Union left deep imprints on the economy, explaining the anomalies of the Russian market.

The first characteristic of the planned economy was the extreme specialization of Russia's regions and it has proved difficult to blur out that interdependence.

"Entire regions, built on a kind of industrial monoculture, are failing to take off," said Jacques Sapir, specialist in Russia at the French School of Advanced Social Sciences.

The major industrial regions such as Omsk in the Urals or Tomsk in Siberia have been profoundly marked, as have the textile regions near Moscow.

Old habits have survived, showing that the process of change is not yet complete.

"Russia has maintained the practice of barter-dealing, which was encouraged by the ultra monetarist policies of 1992-94, but which was also a heritage of the past, when trade was based on the physical exchange of goods between companies," said Gerard Wild, of the French CEPII research center.

Regional bureaucracies have often kept control of resources, deciding whether an enterprise lives or dies, independently of market forces.

"Also there is still no business culture and in Russia there is still no network of dynamic small businesses," said Sapir.

"The Soviet Union produced professionals and engineers, which explains why Russian enterprises know how to produce, but not how to sell," he said.

Thus car-maker VAZ, which produces Lada cars, has failed to set up a network of dealerships. Instead businessman Boris Berezovsky filled the gap setting up his own network known as LogoVaz, independently of VAZ.

Sales networks grew up, often parasitically, to the detriment of production.

Wild recognized however that the Soviet heritage was no longer dominant and that "new methods are gaining ground," but the heritage explained Russian inertia and the difficulties encountered in entering a spiral of growth.

The political world also still bears the marks of the Soviet Union. "The collusion between political rulers and big business which is an important feature of the new Russia was also deeply entrenched in the old system," an analyst said.

www.kprf.ru


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